anathemad: (Silly)
Fizzy Fun

Let your child pour 1/2 cup of food grade vinegar into a large plastic bowl. Discuss with your child what they think might happen when they add baking soda to it. Will they need to mix it for them to combine? Will it change colors? Let your child spoon in <1 tbl of baking soda. Watch it fizz and bubble! If the child is old enough you can discuss the acid/base neutralization. For the younger crowd the fizzing is pretty exciting but coloring the vinegar with food coloring can make the excitement last longer. For the older preschooler you can discuss combining different colors to make new ones.

Pictures at: http://moblog.co.uk/view.php?id=187443
anathemad: (Silly)
Fizzy Fun

Let your child pour 1/2 cup of food grade vinegar into a large plastic bowl. Discuss with your child what they think might happen when they add baking soda to it. Will they need to mix it for them to combine? Will it change colors? Let your child spoon in <1 tbl of baking soda. Watch it fizz and bubble! If the child is old enough you can discuss the acid/base neutralization. For the younger crowd the fizzing is pretty exciting but coloring the vinegar with food coloring can make the excitement last longer. For the older preschooler you can discuss combining different colors to make new ones.

Pictures at: http://moblog.co.uk/view.php?id=187443
anathemad: (Silly)
Ocean in a Bottle
"Did you know that oil is actually lighter than vinegar? You can prove it by creating an Ocean in a Bottle—a great science activity for a rainy afternoon. Use a clean jar or bottle and fill it one-third of the way with white vinegar. Add several drops of blue food coloring and fill the rest of the bottle with a light-colored oil, such as mineral oil. Close the jar tightly and rock it back and forth to see the waves. Because the oil is lighter than vinegar, oil droplets float to the surface and stay there."

Idea from Martha.

http://moblog.co.uk/view.php?id=137532
anathemad: (Silly)
Ocean in a Bottle
"Did you know that oil is actually lighter than vinegar? You can prove it by creating an Ocean in a Bottle—a great science activity for a rainy afternoon. Use a clean jar or bottle and fill it one-third of the way with white vinegar. Add several drops of blue food coloring and fill the rest of the bottle with a light-colored oil, such as mineral oil. Close the jar tightly and rock it back and forth to see the waves. Because the oil is lighter than vinegar, oil droplets float to the surface and stay there."

Idea from Martha.

http://moblog.co.uk/view.php?id=137532
anathemad: (Silly)
Fireworks in a glass
requires:
a glass or jar
two small cups or bowls
water
food coloring
oil
toothpicks or spoons

Filled the glass with cold water. Put a bit of oil (tsp?) in each cup. Added a few drops of one food coloring to one bowl, and a different color to the other. Mix em up using the toothpicks. Pour into the glass of water.

Watch as the oil floats to the top of the glass and all the little puddles of it combine together to make one big slick at the top. Then keep a careful eye out and watch as the food coloring seperates from the oil creating upside down "fireworks" in the glass. Guess which color will hit the bottom first. Watch as the two different colors combine in the water and discuss how different colors combine to make new colors.

In older kids, discuss the different properties of oil vs. water. Retry with different tempture of water to see if it effects the timing to seperate the oil/food coloring. Vary with different kinds of oil as well.

I have started posting pictures to my moblog to go along with these posts. I updated the last two to include some as well

http://moblog.co.uk/view.php?id=135566
anathemad: (Silly)
Fireworks in a glass
requires:
a glass or jar
two small cups or bowls
water
food coloring
oil
toothpicks or spoons

Filled the glass with cold water. Put a bit of oil (tsp?) in each cup. Added a few drops of one food coloring to one bowl, and a different color to the other. Mix em up using the toothpicks. Pour into the glass of water.

Watch as the oil floats to the top of the glass and all the little puddles of it combine together to make one big slick at the top. Then keep a careful eye out and watch as the food coloring seperates from the oil creating upside down "fireworks" in the glass. Guess which color will hit the bottom first. Watch as the two different colors combine in the water and discuss how different colors combine to make new colors.

In older kids, discuss the different properties of oil vs. water. Retry with different tempture of water to see if it effects the timing to seperate the oil/food coloring. Vary with different kinds of oil as well.

I have started posting pictures to my moblog to go along with these posts. I updated the last two to include some as well

http://moblog.co.uk/view.php?id=135566

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December 2015

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